Welcome To My Garden, My Memories, And The Joy They Have Brought Me.

Welcome To My Garden, My Memories, And The Joy They Have Brought Me.

PLANNING YOUR FRUIT ORCHARD

PLANNING YOUR FRUIT ORCHARD

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WHAT SIZE FRUIT TREE SHOULD I PLANT?

When planning your fruit orchard, ask yourself two questions:

  1. How high am I willing to climb to pick the fruit?

  2. How much pruning am I able to do on a tall tree before I have to hire professional help? If you are short, like me, this is something you need to consider before you buy a tree.

“Plan Your Work And Work Your Plan” is always a good motto.

PLANNING YOUR FRUIT ORCHARD, A COUNTRY GARDEN JOURNAL

RELATED ARTICLE:  DECIDING ON A PLANTING LOCATION

People often buy standard (full sized) trees because the dwarf and semi dwarf trees are more expensive. Many people don’t realize what they’re getting themselves into. Standard trees can produce enormous quantities of fruit.

I am a veteran of the annual chore of bending, stooping, gathering, and hauling a garden cart filled with pears from the tree to the house and back again for another load. Enthusiasm wanes in a hurry when you are faced with harvesting and preserving several bushels of fruit that all got ripe at the same time.

RELATED ARTICLE:  CHOOSING THE PERFECT FRUIT TREE

Most of us do not require enough jams, jellies, and fruit syrups for cooking daily breakfasts for eight or ten people or fruit for making six or eight pies at a time for family and hired farm hands as our Grandmothers did.

DWARF VS. FULL SIZED TREES

Properly cared for, a dwarf tree will usually produce enough fruit for most families, especially since many trees require a second fruit tree of a different variety to be planted nearby for cross pollination. Having two standard sized trees might quickly become a burden. Don’t plant more than you can use!

RELATED ARTICLE:  WHY YOU SHOULD GROW YOUR OWN FRUIT

NOTE: If you lose a lot of fruit each year due to wildlife damage, you might still need to plant full sized trees.

Use restraint! I originally wanted one of everything, including the less than ordinary additions to most gardens such as persimmon, pawpaw, fig, etc. The memories I had of my maternal Grandma’s orchard made me want to overplant.

HAPPY PLANTING!  Susan

For more in-depth information on GROWING YOUR OWN FRUIT

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